She wears sweats to the club bc she don’t give a f*$k

Brittney Scott loves diner food. “I linger here a lot,” she said. “Here” being Brite Spot: a popular diner located on the corner of Sunset and Glendale, famous for its pies.

Scott ordered veggie chili over cornbread—a fitting choice for a rainy Thursday evening. She came to the interview sans make up, dressed casually in an oversized sweatshirt with her hair tied up in a bun resembling her twitter avatar, B6 Sad Girl. Make up, however, is unnecessary, as Scott’s natural beauty possesses a Classical Hollywood quality—bearing a striking resemblance to starlet Rita Hayworth.

With over 7,000 Twitter followers, including big names like Snoop Dogg, Skrillex and Major Lazer, Scott’s life resembles a rave wonderland. She regularly hangs out backstage at EDM shows, parties with the world’s top DJ’s and has even hosted multiple episodes of a webseries produced by Vice.

Although selfies are the currency of the Twittersphere, Scott is actually quite camera shy. Sure, she allows her photo to be taken, but that doesn’t mean she will be pleased with the result. Scott doesn’t think she photographs well—which is how B6 Sad Girl was born. “One day I was like, I’m really over this, and I just like downloaded this app and drew a dumb picture.”

Boredom, she says, prompted her to draw “her friends and stuff.” And it wasn’t long before Scott started receiving requests from her fans, asking her to draw their portraits. “I have a few 100 people in my inbox right now waiting for me to draw them,” she said.

Scott accepts submissions to her email, which is listed in her Twitter bio. “send selfie 2 ladiesndrank01@hotmail.com,” it says. Typical LOLspeak.

Despite the demand for her work, Scott doesn’t charge for the drawings—most likely a deliberate decision, as she is well aware of the marketability of her artwork. When asked why she hasn’t replaced B6 Sad Girl with a different photo or drawing, Scott replied that not only was she reluctant to take a picture of herself, but she also expressed an interest in marketing and branding. In her own words: “I was like, ‘I wonder how far this could reach.’”

And reach it did. Although it sounds counterintuitive, drawing for free is most likely the reason Scott’s following blew up so quickly over the past year. As she tries to figure out the best possible business model to leverage her art into a career, making herself accessible to fans has given her brand of art room to continue its growth without losing momentum.

Part of this journey to make art into a career has led Scott to try her hand at producing an art show of the work she has done over the past year. “I’m hoping that will actually break me in, where I can actually do art as a profession,” she says.

Scott is producing the show independently and has been working on putting it together over the past few months. The process has been slow going because she has had to do everything herself—from printing and framing the drawings to finding and paying for the location—all while holding down a regular full-time job and keeping up with all the drawing requests.

“I’ve approached galleries,” she said, “and there is this whole system of the art world that I’m just not a part of because I don’t know it and it’s also very old school. And then there is also a struggle for digital art.”

Indeed, while the pace has been slow, the pieces are coming together as she recently found a venue she likes—a vacant retail space in Hollywood.

“It’s just been hard,” she admits, “because I wasn’t pursuing art and so I didn’t really know what I should have been doing and I still don’t know what I should be doing. But also I would have never got into it for it to be a profession…so it’s kind of just fallen in my lap and if it could turn into something, great. And if not, I’ll just figure out other ways…”

Scott may consider herself an “accidental artist,” but there is nothing “accidental” about her artwork. Everything about it is deliberate and more importantly, honest. Though shy on camera, Scott has no problem showcasing her vulnerabilities via artwork. B6 Sad Girl’s is more than just a physical representation of Scott—she is an emotional likeness as well. The frown on B6 Sad Girl is an amalgamation of Scott’s emotions and experiences, beginning with her aversion to being photographed and ending with her I-don’t-give-a-f*$k-yes-I’m-wearing-sweats-to-the-club attitude. The frown isn’t so much an expression of personal angst as it is a challenge for others to find a way to embrace themselves.